Without discrimination for religion, race, or gender

Dublin Core

Title

Without discrimination for religion, race, or gender

Author

Ben-David, Orit Brawer
Abu-Rabia, Aref

Publisher

2002/00/00

Language

English

Publication Date

20020000

Abstract

The transplantation of organs, which at first sight appears to be just a technical medical procedure, is, first and foremost a sociocultural action that gives expression to existential perceptions. In Israeli society, as in most western societies the donation of the body or parts of it, is interpreted as possible at a societal level, and not as a gift from one individual to another. The medical achievement inherent in organ transplantation brings forward the relationship between the body, death and society. The moment the body ceases to function biologically, its position within the social entity is examined. The donation of organs evinces the acceptance of the idea that the personal body belongs to the society which sanctions the transition of the private body into organs that become national assets. This research is a first attempt to study the motives of people from Muslim society, who donated organs of their dear ones. The ability of these people to enter into a system of exchange flows from a tacit assumption by all of them that the action is approved by their social group. This paper presents the concepts of death and of the body that enable donation in general and the donation of the Muslim population in particular.

Primary Classification

19.5

Secondary Classification

19.5;1.2;20.3.3;4.4

Primary keywords

Arabs--[pri];Islamic ethics--[pri];motivation--[pri];Muslims--[pri];organ donation--[pri]

Secondary keywords

altruism;attitudes to death;cadavers;family members;human body;physician's role;sharia;third party consent;transplant recipients

Subject

Israel--[pri]

Journal Article

Medicine and Law: World Association for Medical Law 2002; 21(2): 281-293

Note

29

Primary Document Type

ja

Call Number

journal

Bibliography

12 refs. 4 fn.

Collection

Citation

“Without discrimination for religion, race, or gender,” Islamic Medical & Scientific Ethics, accessed June 25, 2024, http://imse.ibp.georgetown.domains/items/show/33780.